Some Favorite Quotes from World Economic Forum in Davos

“Success and likeability are positively correlated for men and negatively correlated for women. […] We never call boys bossy. Any of the women in the room who as a girl were called bossy? If you got to  Davos you were called that. I was!”
~ Sheryl Sandberg, on women as the way forward.

“I have succeeded so much in life because I only had to compete with half the population.”
~ Warren Buffet, on gender equality.

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Everyone Has a Story (Liberia Archives)

 K. Lost both parents to the war at age 13.
Taught me how to play a card game called “AK47“.

Le Quarantième Jour

J’aurais aimé être avec toi aujourd’hui. Aussi fort que j’aurais aimé être présente le jour de ton départ le 4 Décembre pour te dire adieu en bonne et due forme.
A défaut, j’honore ta mémoire à distance, dans mon petit studio de Boston. Je sais que tes autres petits fils font de même, de Londres, Dublin, San Francisco, les Alpes, Montréal, Illinois, Dubaï, Bogota, et Paris. Tu vois, Jeddo, ta semence a fait le tour du monde.
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Revolution Tourism in Tunis

I was in Tunis for the one-year anniversary of the revolution – Dec 17.
The energy, optimism and pride of everyone I met was truly inspiring.

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Raising awareness against gender violence

Husbands, love your wives and do not be harsh with them (Colossians 3:19)

Somewhere in Ada Foah, near Accra, a community effort to raise awareness against domestic violence.

 

Busan: Hopes for more aid effectiveness after High Level Forum?

The development sphere is abuzz with anticipation, as the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness is set to take place in Busan, South Korea, November 29 to December 1st.

But previous aid effectiveness resolutions have fallen short of providing the desired impact. One of the reasons for their shortcoming is the following: by looking for identifying a universally agreeable standard (of aid transparency, for example), donors end up with a weak lowest denominator resolution. And the reluctance of some new donors like China and Brazil to increase their aid transparency could set the threshold even lower this year. As it stands now, the latest draft of the outcome document is still very general.

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Young Activists, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and Rebel Leader Discuss What is Next for Arab Awakening

This post originally appeared on Wamda.com

The Arab World’s overdue awakening is now irreversible and unstoppable. This was the feeling that dominated the 5th Harvard Arab Weekend (HAW), which took place this weekend across Harvard University. Under the theme Arab (R)evolution: What’s Next?, the weekend brought together more than 600 participants in what is the largest pan-Arab conference in North America. In place of the usual royals and government figures, this year’s conference showcased opposition figures, rebel leaders, and young activists – in whose hands lies the future of the region.

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Atlas of Economic Complexity: Mapping Paths to Growth

It is finally out!*
Ricardo Hausmann and Cesar Hidalgo’s latest baby is out and is downloadable here.
The Atlas measures the diversity of productive knowledge of 128 countries, and determines their growth potential accordingly. The top 10 countries are *drum roll* (extract from the press release):

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Liberians Go to the Polls


Tomorrow morning Liberians go to the polls for the second time since the end of the civil war in 2003.

16 presidential candidates are running for the executive post. But the two main contenders are Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf and William Tubman (both Harvard graduates). (eh, couldn’t resist plugging that in). Senatorial and legislative seats are also up for grabs in this election.

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Local Economy Takes Root in Liberia (re-post)

Reblogged from Peace Dividend Trust – published on Sept. 28, 2011

How do corporations secure natural resources (such as rubber) in a sustained way over a long period of time – knowing that most resource-rich countries are also usually prone to instability? The way corporations have traditionally done so is by signing long-term deals with the government of the country (be it a democratically elected one or not) and providing some basic services to the employees it hires (usually as little as their company’s Corporate Responsibility allows) – Firestone style. This old model is attractive because it is financially viable.

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